A skeptical red gecko

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geisha-kai:

Maiko Satsuki and Sachiho.  Photography by Oatjiro on Flickr

geisha-kai:

Maiko Satsuki and Sachiho.  Photography by Oatjiro on Flickr

laughhard:

I live in a conservative/unfunny town, so this type of thing is almost unheard of

laughhard:

I live in a conservative/unfunny town, so this type of thing is almost unheard of

bridle-less:

thestasher:

That’s a keeper for the wedding album.

omfg

bridle-less:

thestasher:

That’s a keeper for the wedding album.

omfg

(Source: thehighwayphantom)

iseo58:

Japan

iseo58:

Japan

synergyfox:

There’s some ships you ship… that have massive amounts of shippers right along with you. Then there’s the ships… those ships you have that are near and dear to your heart where you’re in a fucking canoe with like… four other people.

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Info Post!

shinjis9:

This is a geisha/geiko:

image

Keep in mind how much of her hair you actually see, and the fact that while she has a few hair ornaments, it’s not an excessive amount!

Now this is an oiran (a courtesan):

image

You don’t have to see her face. Look at how many hair ornaments she’s wearing. An…

taishou-kun:

Oda Tomiya 小田富弥 (1895-1990)
Beauty resting, summer evening - Circa 1926

taishou-kun:

Oda Tomiya 小田富弥 (1895-1990)

Beauty resting, summer evening - Circa 1926

oiran-geisha:

February motifs:

The kimono of February are particular because the first half of the month the geisha wear a kimono with winter motifs and on the second half they wear a kimono with flower for mark the start of the spring. The winter is shown with snowflake, bamboo sometimes, holly (more rarely), stylized waves or tortoise shell, little arabesques and bell. For the spring the flower are more present particularly the plum blossoms because it’s the first flower who bloom in Japan. But you can see also the flower of willow, daffoldil and camellia. And rarely, very rarely the mist.

The color are light crimson, yellow, black (it’s not a formal kimono), sweet green, maybe navy. And for the night the pale colors February.

So I show you the motifs of February BUT I can’t show you everything I have say. Please enjoy this post and be happy! ♥

The hikizuri on the first picture is a typical kimono of the second half of February. The color is dark, deep and the motif are plum flower. The maiko Ichitomo wear it for a Baikasai. (Source)

The kimono on the second picture is more unsual. Momokazu wear this hikizuri during the first half of February. It’s unsual because ordinarily the bamboo motif is with snow and not here. It’s unsual but beautiful! (Source)

The thrid picture show a beautiful light crimson kimono with stylized waves motifs. It’s a kimono for the first half but i think it’s can to wear in the second half also… The maiko who wear this hikizuri is Korin. (Source)

The fourth picture show a lovely kimono with stylized tortoise shell motifs. It’s a motifs for give a lucky and it’s a very very tradionnal motifs. Ayako wear it for Setsubun. (Source)

And the last picture show the maiko Eriha who wear a kimono with lot of little plum blossom. It’s very great kimono! It’s also a great example for the second half of February. (Source)

mikaeri-yanagi:

Three Women Playing Instruments by (Hokusai’s daughter) Katsushika Ôi
They all appear to be geisha, each one playing a different instrument. The geisha profession as we know it today began with the musicians hired to entertain at ageya (brothel) banquets while patrons came calling on courtesans. Certain instruments and music, because of their bawdy lyrics and popularity with common folk, were considered too vulgar for a courtesan to learn—but that’s what their visitors from the outside world enjoyed, and so it was a necessity. Geisha rapidly eclipsed the courtesans in popularity because of their availability (no real formality needed unlike today) and their amiable, easy-going personalities. 
The woman in the top right is playing a kokyuu. Geisha no longer play this, but tayuu still do. (Kisaragi-tayuu in the link)
The woman in the top right is playing a shamisen, still the instrument for geisha. (maiko Fukunae in the link)
The woman in the center is playing a koto. Both geisha and tayuu play this. (Kikugawa-tayuu in the link)
Together these 3 instruments are used in Japanese chamber music, known as Sankyoku 三曲(click and listen).
Which is your favorite? I think the kokyuu is most mysterious. It has that familiar violin-like melancholy and yet… while the shamisen and koto sound definitely foreign. All 3 send shivers down my spine.

mikaeri-yanagi:

Three Women Playing Instruments by (Hokusai’s daughter) Katsushika Ôi

They all appear to be geisha, each one playing a different instrument. The geisha profession as we know it today began with the musicians hired to entertain at ageya (brothel) banquets while patrons came calling on courtesans. Certain instruments and music, because of their bawdy lyrics and popularity with common folk, were considered too vulgar for a courtesan to learn—but that’s what their visitors from the outside world enjoyed, and so it was a necessity. Geisha rapidly eclipsed the courtesans in popularity because of their availability (no real formality needed unlike today) and their amiable, easy-going personalities. 

The woman in the top right is playing a kokyuu. Geisha no longer play this, but tayuu still do.
(Kisaragi-tayuu in the link)

The woman in the top right is playing a shamisen, still the instrument for geisha.
(maiko Fukunae in the link)

The woman in the center is playing a koto. Both geisha and tayuu play this.
(Kikugawa-tayuu in the link)

Together these 3 instruments are used in Japanese chamber music, known as Sankyoku 三曲(click and listen).

Which is your favorite? I think the kokyuu is most mysterious. It has that familiar violin-like melancholy and yet… while the shamisen and koto sound definitely foreign. All 3 send shivers down my spine.

(Source: tastefullyoffensive)